Ashlee and Cory

Ashlee and Cory talk about their home buying experience with Darryl

How to Keep Your Mortgage Approval Approved

You know how tough it is to qualify for a mortgage.

Proof you’ve got a long-term job with ample income. A credit score to the moon. Your life’s savings as a down payment. More cash stashed away. A debt-to-income ratio to die for. For some, tax returns for the last two years.

You’ve been there, done that. For weeks now. Maybe a month or more.

You’ve fought the good fight, you’ve run the gauntlet of mortgage qualifications and you have your signature-tired hands on that coveted home loan approval.

Now, all you have to do is not blow it.

For goodness sake, don’t make any surprise financial moves that could cost you your home loan.

Your mortgage approval is primarily based on documenting your income and assets, your equity stake or down payment, your credit and the cash you’ll have left over after the deal is done.

Once you have a mortgage approval, if you change the profile of any one of those qualifiers, you could have to kiss your mortgage goodbye.

Lenders today don’t just check your qualifying information once or even twice. Three, four or more checks, of one document or another, aren’t out of the question in today’s tight lending market.

Avoid big purchases – If you buy a new car, change the lease, or acquire another large possession, it could show up on your credit report or bank statement.

The lender could think you’ve gone beyond the risk the lender is willing to accept on your mortgage – especially if you qualified by a hair.

If the new loan or purchase amount upsets the debt-to-income ratio the lender used to approve your home loan, your mortgage could go “poof.”

No new credit – Likewise, don’t open new credit cards, even for a zero interest rate. Those credit card offers will come streaming in after you close your mortgage. Just wait. The lender didn’t approve you based on the additional card or extra loan.

Pay your bills – Also, pay your bills on time, even if there’s a dispute. Stop paying a bill and the blotch on your credit report can block your mortgage.

Keep your job – Be kind to your boss and don’t get fired. Also, don’t go looking for new work right now, unless it’s a second job to make more money.

Certain job changes also can affect how the lender rates your creditworthiness.

That includes a job change between industries, a job change to start a new company and changing from a job with a salary to a job that pays by commission.

On the other hand, get a promotion and a raise and you should be fine.

Don’t cash out – Leave your stashes of cash alone. Don’t transfer large sums of money between bank accounts. Don’t make random, undocumented deposits to or withdrawals from your bank account.

Don’t be stupid – It should go without saying, but criminal activity, trying to buy a second home and trying to add a co-signer or name to the loan, after approval, could all also get your mortgage canned.

Remember, stuff happens. There are events beyond your control that could cost you your mortgage. A pink slip. A divorce. Hospitalization. The co-signer bails.

However, once your mortgage is approved, do keep tight reigns on what you can control. 

Written by Broderick Perkins

 

 Questions? Comments? Feel free to give me a call @ 614-783-6796 for more information!

LED Holiday Lights: 6 Need-to-Know Tips

By: G. M. Filisko

Published: December 10, 2010

LED holiday lights vs. old-fashioned bulbs: 6 tips to help you decide which is right for you.

 

1. LED holiday lights save you money. LED lights use at least 90% less energy than traditional holiday lights, according to the U.S. government’s Energy Star program.

That results in a $50 energy savings for the average family during the holidays, says Avital Binshtock of the Sierra Club in San Francisco.

Put it into perspective: The amount of electricity consumed by one 7-watt incandescent bulb could power 140 LEDs—enough to light two 24-foot strings, says Energy Star.

2. But LED lights typically cost more than old-fashioned holiday lights.

  • GE 100-bulb string of Energy Star-certified LED white lights: $18.97 at Lowe’s
  • GE 100-bulb string of conventional white lights: $8.97

But shop around because a growing number of retailers are offering sales on LED holiday lights and, if you can’t find a sale before the holidays, you can certainly find one after. Plus, prices will surely go down as these lights gain traction.

3. LED holiday lights last and last. LED bulbs can keep your season bright for as long as 100,000 hours, says Cathy Choi, president of Moonachie, N.J.-based Bulbrite, which manufactures LED and regular bulbs. That’s substantially longer than the life of your old holiday light strings.

4. You can string a BIG strand of LED lights. Safety wise, you shouldn’t connect more than three traditional light strings, but you can connect up to 87 LED holiday light strings, totaling a whopping 1,500 feet, Choi says. So blow your neighbor’s display away by cocooning your house in lights:

  • You won’t have to buy as many extension cords.
  • You can take your holiday lighting display further away from the outlet.

5. LED lights reduce the risk of fire. They stay cooler than incandescent bulbs, according to Energy Star.

6. How about that hue? Some people stick with their old lights because they don’t like the brighter hue that white LED holiday lights emit. But Choi says manufacturers now offer a “warm white” bulb that more closely mimics the glow of an incandescent light. Be sure to read the label to choose a bright or warm white and to ensure what you’re purchasing isEnergy Star-certified.

Colored and color-changing LED holiday lights are more vibrant than conventional lights, making your display easier to see from the street, Choi says.

Brand New HomeOwners Talk About Their Buying Experience w/Darryl

For information on how I can help you find your dream home contact Darryl Threat @ 614-783-6796!!!

Happy New Home Owner Talk about Their Experience

Five Areas That Can Hurt Your Appraisal

When you’re listing your home for sale, one of the things that is very vital is the appraisal. Yet, this is an area that can be significantly positively or negatively influenced by what you do or don’t do to your home before it is appraised.

Knowing which areas to pay particular attention to can help you increase your home’s value. Here are five areas that can hurt your appraisal.

 

  • Unkept exterior/interior

    Having a messy home from the outside in, not only can cause potential buyers to turn away from your home but it can also cause an appraiser to shave a little off your appraisal. If the exterior has lots of overgrown and unkept bushes and the house is dilapidated, this could cause the appraiser to take “as much as 3 percent off”, according to CNNMoney.

    Curb appeal doesn’t just help entice buyers to come in and see more of your home, it can actually increase your appraisal value. Also, If neighboring homes are meticulously kept up and yours isn’t, this could cause your appraisal to be even more severely downgraded. A carefully maintained yard is a sign that the home is also likely kept up.

     

  • Trendy Remodels

    Remodeling can certainly add value to your home, especially if you’re adding storage, room additions, and other important improvements that are popular among buyers. However, if you do a costly and trendy remodel and think that the true cost will equal the value, you could likely be very disappointed.

    Some remodels add value while others can actually hurt you when an appraisal is done. To make the most of a remodel, renovations should keep in line with the historical period of the home. If they don’t, then an appraiser will assess the cost of having the remodel taken out such as a trendy custom-built, entertainment center. However adding space to the kitchen using timeless styles will add value.

     

  • Unfinished remodeling projects

    Don’t have an appraiser inspect when your remodels are incomplete. If you must get the home appraised and work is nearly complete at the time of the appraisal, be sure to give the appraiser a full description of the job and what is being done to quickly and professionally complete it.

     

  • Forgetting to list improvements

    Don’t expect all improvements to help your appraisal. For instance, a new roof won’t count. Buyers and appraisers expect a roof to be in good condition. However, some other improvements could add value to the appraisal. Rather than trying to determine which improvement will increase your value, compile a detailed list and give it to the appraiser. Have copies of any documentation, such as city permits that were necessary, available for the appraiser to review.

     

  • Not doing your homework

    It is important to understand your marketplace and what homes similar to yours have recently sold for. For instance, it is especially vital to know the reason a home that is similar to yours sold for less. That way you can explain to the appraiser the difference between yours and the one that sold for a lower price. Be sure to use an experienced real estate agent to provide you with market information before you have your home appraised.

    Taking the time to understand the areas that can positively influence your appraisal can help ward off the chances that your home will be appraised at a lower value than the asking price. 

    Written by Phoebe Chongchua

     

    For all of your Real Estate needs contact Darryl at 614-783-6796 or dcthreat@gmail.com

Six Musts Before You List Your Home

Deciding to list your home for sale is a momentous time. It means you will be moving on to a new stage of life, no matter if you’re moving up or sizing down. Take a moment to look over these tips for what every seller should do before they put their home on the market.

Organize Your Paperwork: Every homeowner should have a detailed list of all past repairs, updates, and upgrades they’ve made. This will help your agent know what should be mentioned on the MLS. Did you put on a new roof in 2010 or a install a new water heater in 2009? These are great selling features because they mean less work in the future for the prospective buyer.
Also included in this list should be any home warranty information. These warranties will most likely transfer with title of the home.

Get Ready to Declutter: Even before you’ve officially listed your home for sale, you should start getting rid of things you don’t need. Starting now will mean a more thorough and less rushed job of clearing things out.
Start with one closet and work your way through the entire home. Sort items to toss, keep, sell, and donate.

Having a yard sale is a wonderful way of making a little extra pocket change while reducing the amount of things you’ll have in your home during showings and that you’ll need to pack up and move. It’s a win-win!

Clean, Clean, and Clean Some More: Dirty homes are a real buyer turnoff. Now is a great time wash down walls, spruce up paint, and give your entire home a thorough cleaning. Do your carpets need refreshing? Consider renting a carpet shampoo machine or hiring a professional carpet cleaning company to come in and revamp your carpets.
Chances are buyers will ask for this anyway come closing time. You’ll beat them to the punch and have a shiny, sparkling home to show for it.

Get an Inspection: Did you think inspections were only for buyers? Having a pre-sale inspection can mean identifying problem areas. Perhaps you’re unaware that your foundation needs repaired. This will severely affect your listing price. It’s best to be prepared and realistic in today’s market.
Make Repairs or Get Estimates: Your inspection will likely leave you with a list of repairs, large and small, that need made. Keep in mind that prospective buyers will also get an inspection of your home and will find these same issues. Head them off at the pass and do some fixing up. You may wish to go ahead with large repairs. If not, be sure to at least get estimates so you are fully prepared for negotiations (you’ll know what the real cost should be) or so you can provide the estimates for buyers.
Start Staging: Staging is like prepping your home for its first date. You want to have it clean and well-dressed. This means amping up curb appeal with neat landscaping, fresh paint, and flowers. It means rearranging furniture and removing clutter.
Congratulations on deciding to list your home for sale. Be proactive about making a good first step by following these tried and true tips.

Written by Carla Hill